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  • The Obs: A Singapore Story

    Singapore | 98 minutes | English, Indonesian | English subtitles | Format – DCP

    • Official Selection, 25th Singapore International Film Festival 2014
    • Official Selection, 14th Cinedays Festival of European Film (Macedonia) 2015
    • Official Selection, 10th Festival of Music Documentaries DORF (Croatia) 2016

     

    “[A] tale of an alternative Singapore, expressed through the eyes, words and instruments of these incendiary—and at times inscrutable—musicians. It’s a parable of the city, one in which the fury of the common folk bubbles without boiling over.” —Time Out Singapore

    “Must-watch…The story of Singapore’s hardest working and longest-surviving indie band, The Observatory, is told through archival footage and interviews in this contemplative documentary by filmmaker Yeo Siew Hua on what it means to think like an outsider in a society that favours the mainstream.” —The Business Times

    “[An] insightful peak into the band’s development over the years, how it weathered changes in creative direction, to evolve and to produce arguably the local scene’s most inventive music. Not just for the fans, it’s a story about the Singapore experience. Through archival footage and interviews, this is the closest one can get to The Observatory.” —Bandwagon

    Synopsis

    Hailed as Singapore’s most important independent band, The Observatory and their brooding, brilliant and confounding music are explored in this quietly contemplative music documentary. Tracing the footsteps of the group’s core members, THE OBS: A SINGAPORE STORY looks back at the country’s early nation-building period, when native music faced a clampdown by the government, which accused it of ‘western decadence’, to understand the creative process of one of Singapore’s longest-surviving outfits. From Bali to Bergen, THE OBS highlights the constant struggle between artistic vision and pragmatic realities; an unwavering commitment to evolution versus a society that unforgivingly favours the mainstream. More than a music film, THE OBS is a tale of uncompromising passion, of culture and of belonging, and the costs—and invaluable rewards—of being creative.

    Director’s Statement

    In 2011, I was approached to make a short video on Singapore music legend, Leslie Low, the vocalist and guitarist for The Observatory. I was surprised by how popular the video became, especially when the general impression is that there is a lack of quality local musicians and people are not interested in home-grown music. But if we only probe a little deeper, we would discover that Singapore music has thrived—in fits and spurts—since the 1960s and that in recent years, there has been an explosion of young bands. Movements in the arts and music aren’t formed out of pure momentum, however, they have to be documented. For instance, the second golden era of local music in the early 1990s fizzled out with the physical death of the influential BigO zine. In late 2011, I was sitting at my desk clearing up space on my hard drive and moved the Leslie footage into the trash. I remember a moment of hesitation before I emptied the trash and the familiar sound of paper crushing was heard. It is at times like this, when something is finally lost, that one suddenly feels the emptiness. I realised it wasn’t only some piece of my own memory that got emptied out, but a bigger piece of collective heritage that had just disappeared. At this, I phoned my producers and said, “We need to do a documentary on The Observatory.”

    Director’s Biography

    Yeo Siew Hua is a winner of the Kodak Singapore Prize for Cinematography and the Cathay Organisation Gold Medal. IN THE HOUSE OF STRAW, which he wrote and directed, is his debut feature film that premiered in competition at the Bangkok International Film Festival 2009 and was presented at the 34th Sao Paulo International Film Festival 2010, where it was lauded by critics as a significant film of the Singapore New Wave.

    Cast

    Leslie Low Vivian Wang Dharma Victor Low Evan Tan X’Ho Bani Haykal Mark Dolmont Debbie Ding David Toop

    Crew

    Director/Writer/Editor: Yeo Siew Hua
    Producers:Adeline Setiawan, Dan Koh, Yeo Siew Hua
    Music: The Observatory
    Audio Post: Justin Seah
    Camera: Aaron Ng, Adeline Setiawan, Andrew Sobrielo, Anisah Aidid, Cain Chui, Dan Koh, Elizabeth Lim, Eric Lee, Looi Wan Ping, Nigel Hogan, Patrick Ong, Samantha Sng, Tian Low, Wu Jun Han, Yang Vicki, Yeo Siew Hua
    Sound: Hussin Ismail, Jenn Hui, Yong Rong Zhao, Patrick Chan, See Tong Wai
    Photography: Philipp Aldrup Photography, Koh Nguang How, David Ee, Hoong Wei Long
    Associate Producers: JD Chua, Tian Low
    Consultants: Leon Cheo, Patrick Ong

    Technical Specifications

    Country of production: Singapore
    Production company: 13 Little Pictures
    Running length: 98 minutes / Colour
    Year of release: 2015
    Language: English & Indonesian
    Subtitles: English
    Screening format: DCP
    Aspect ratio: 16:9
    Sound: Stereo

    PRESS AND INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION / SALES CONTACT

    Dan Koh | Producer
    obsdocu@gmail.com

    Film website    Trailer

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  • Ge Ye Fan (Father & Daughter)

    Ge Ye Fan

    Director: Gladys Ng
    Producer: Liao Jiekai
    Project Status: Development / Pre-production

    SYNOPSIS

    Ge Ye Fan (english title: Father & Daughter), is a heartwarming family story told through the eyes of an elderly father and his prodigal daughter, Ying. A fresh graduate from university, Ying is insecure about her future; drifting about odd jobs, feeling guilty towards her elderly father and unsure about her own sexuality, Ying navigates through the post-modern metropolis trying to find her own footing in life. The only familiar event that gives her any comfort is the family dinner every weekend. Set in the Singapore heartlands of today, the film aims at capturing the tenderness of familial ties between father and daughter through the making of a simple home-cooked meal.

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  • Kopi Julia (Julia’s Coffee)

    Malaysia, Singapore | 7 min | Silent, B&W | Malay Intertitles, English Subtitles | HD

    • Sharjah Biennial 2013, curated by Apichatpong Weerasethakul
    SYNOPSIS

    Ikram brings home his classmates to feed Julia, his blood-sucking stepmum. When Julia starts flirting with a classmate Ikram has been secretly admiring, he flies into a rage of jealousy. An adaptation from a short story by Faizal Sulaiman, Kopi Julia is a film tribute to the Malay horror films made in the 50s in Singapore.

    Cast
    Julia……………… Amy Tashiana
    Ikram …………… Raimi Liandy Safari
    Rashad …………. Muhammad Ridhwan bin Rahmat

    Also starring Adeline Setiawan, Ong Szu Jie, Vicki Yang and Miu Miu

    Crew
    Executive Producer Amir Muhammad
    Directed and produced by Tan Bee Thiam
    Adapted from “Kopi Julia” by Faizal Sulaiman, a short story in Kopi (published by Buku Fixi)
    Photography by Looi Wan Ping
    Edited by Liao Jiekai
    Music by Benjamin Lim Yi
    Assistant Direction: Vicki Yang
    Makeup: Colin Moy
    Casting: Wesley Leon Aroozoo
    with thanks to Stephane Lasserre, Max Lim and Sherman Ong

    DIRECTOR’S BIO

    Tan Bee Thiam is a filmmaker with the 13 Little Pictures film collective and the editor of Cinemas of Asia, the Journal of the Network for the Promotion of Asian Cinema.

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  • Eclipses

    Singapore | 103 minutes | English, Teochew, Mandarin, Bahasa Indonesia, Bengali | English | Format – 16mm film

    • DocLisboa International Film Festival, Portugal 2013 [awarded Pixel Bunker Award for International New Talent]
    • World Film Festival Bangkok, Thailand 2013
    • Reggio Emilia Asian Film Festival, Italy 2012
    • Singapore International Film Festival, Singapore 2011

    “Never before has cinema spoken to me in ways as such, and the experience from having two characters speak straight to you is both liberating and intimate.” – Ivan Tan, Sindie

    “Eclipses [is] extraordinary, because what [it presents] is not only the information, but the souls of the persons.” – Jit Prokeaw

    Synopsis

    A woman begins to come to terms with society after having withdrawn into her own world to mourn her late husband. The film splinters away to document the characters surrounding her – people from different classes, including the director’s own family. An investigation of the landscapes in which we live, work, and play, this is Singapore seen through the prisms of family, class and race.

    Director’s Statement

    Eclipses was conceived at the juncture of the personal and the political, the individual and the collective, the particular and the universal. It will attempt to navigate the uncertain territory between Heidegger and Marx, taking as its starting point an amalgamation of Europa ’51 and The Man With A Movie Camera. It is a film about absence (hence, the title) – the absence of the husband that ignites the story, the absence of the world that the woman denies, and later the absence of the woman itself as she is subsumed into the world. It will be a sociological document that describes society at every level of production; at the same time, it will be an emotional document about the different stages of grieving, about realizing one’s place in the world around us.

    Director’s Biography

    Daniel Hui is a filmmaker and writer. A graduate of the film program in California Institute of the Arts, his films have been screened at film festivals in Rotterdam, Hawaii, Manila, Seoul, Bangkok, and Vladivostok. His writings have been published in prominent cinema journals, including the Cinematheque Quarterly of the National Museum Singapore. He is the contributing editor to the Network for the Promotion of Asian Cinema (NETPAC) online journal, Cinemas of Asia. He is also one of the founding members of 13 Little Pictures, an independent film collective whose films have garnered critical acclaim all around the world. He recently won the Pixel Bunker Award for International New Talent at the Doclisboa International Film Festival for his début feature film Eclipses.

    Technical Specifications

    Directed by Daniel Hui

    Country of production: Singapore

    Production Company: 13 Little Pictures

    Format: 16mm

    Genre: Drama

    Estimated Running Time: 103 min

    PRESS AND INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION / SALES CONTACT

    13littlepictures@gmail.com

    Trailer: YouTube

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  • I Have Loved

    Cambodia | 74 minutes | English | English Subtitles | HDCam

    • Asian Feature Film Competition, 24th Singapore International Film Festival
    • Main Competition, 10th Asian Film Festival, Reggio Emilia
    • Asian New Talent Awards, 15th Shanghai International Film Festival
    • In Competition, Asia Pacific Screen Awards 2012
    • Frame X Frame Film Series, Presented by The Arts House & Supported by Singapore Film Commission
    • Feature Film Section, 3rd Cambodia International Film Festival
    • Asian Contemporary Section, 11th World Film Festival of Bangkok

    SYNOPSIS

    What does it mean to declare or even whisper: I have loved?

    In Siem Reap, a young woman, haunted by loss, mourning, melancholia and the imperfections of memory, dances with two men–one of whom she is married to, while the other is engaged to be married.

    DIRECTOR’S STATEMENT

    Marie goes to Cambodia in search of a romantic honeymoon but is confronted with the ambiguities of life and struggles with emotions and impulses beyond her understanding. “I Have Loved” is an intimate exploration of human consciousness, time and ways of remembering. After the death of her husband, Marie is haunted by an eclipsed memory—she cannot remember a key traumatic event as it happened. Trapped in a Freudian cycle of mourning and repetition, she returns to Siem Reap to remember—so that she may forget. But she fails to achieve her desired catharsis. When she meets Amarin, who is drawn to her grief due to his own buried sorrow, light shines into her cloistered soul but guilt, fear and their vast differences makes them remain both soul mates and strangers. The landscape and architecture of Siem Reap and the Angkor temples are also characters in this film that explores contradiction on different levels.

    The town of Siem Reap, compact and yet filled with contradictory building styles and transient tourists, is a metaphor for the frazzled yet searching and hopeful minds of the characters. The splendor and illusion of the grand and cold Hotel de la Paix as a modern temple for privileged pilgrims gestures towards Resnais’ “Last Year in Marienbad” and also the Angkor temples. The time- weathered temples form the emotional core of the film and visually allude to the ancient human soul—battered yet magnificent before the dust of modernity. The visual style of the film will be poetic and allusive, as if experiencing someone else’s dream. Beauty on the screen is meant to reveal the ephemerality of beauty and the fear of emptiness beneath. References include the paintings of Degas, Richter and also Louis Le Brocquy. This film is also intended as a love note to Cambodia. While the trauma of its recent past needs to be remembered, showcasing the glory of its ancient history and landscape is also an affirmation of its future. Like Marie learns, Cambodia, especially with the Khmer Rouge Tribunal, confronts a painful history rather than try to forget what is impossible to forget. However, the film avoids any explicit reference to politics. The world, in fact, is almost solipsistic as Marie’s epic emotional voyage colors the mood of the film.

    DIRECTOR’S BIOGRAPHY

    Elizabeth Wijaya is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature at Cornell University under the Cornell Research Scholarship and the HASTAC Scholarship. Her co-directorial debut feature film, I Have Loved, has competed in international festivals in Singapore, Reggio Emilia and Shanghai. She has presented papers at international academic conferences, such as Writing in a Post-Derridean Era, JD09, Derrida Today 2, Derrida Today 3, and where ghosts live. Her paper “To Learn to Live with Spectral Justice: Derrida – Levinas”, was published in Derrida Today Vol.5, Issue 2, (Nov 2012).

    Lai Weijie graduated with a B.A. (Hons) in Philosophy at the National University of Singapore before receiving an M.F.A. in Film Production from NYU Tisch School of the Arts Asia on the Media Development Authority of Singapore’s Media Education Scheme scholarship. His co-directorial debut, I Have Loved, was in competition at the 15th Shanghai International Film Festival and the Asia Pacific Screen Awards 2012. He also co-produced Homecoming that made more than S$3 million in Singapore and Malaysia. Recent producing credits include That Girl in Pinafore and No Regrets!, one of the 25 projects in the Co-FPC at the Shanghai Film Market.

    TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

    HD 25fps, 16:9 PAL, Stereo

    Directed by Elizabeth Wijaya & Lai Weijie

    Written by Elizabeth Wijaya & Lai Weijie

    Produced by Tan Bee Thiam

    Country of production: Siem Reap, Cambodia

    Production Company: 13 Little Pictures, E&W Films

    Format: HD

    Genre: Drama

    Running Time: 75 min

    CAST

    Glen Goei as Harold

    Amarin Cholvibul as Amarin

    Eryn Tett as Marie

    Laetitia Gangotena as Brunette

    CREW

    Cinematography by Eugene Koh

    Edited by Azharr Rudin

    Line Producer Sherman Lai

    Unit Production Manager Luch Ratha

    Assistant Director Sangchul Lee, Gayle Hariff

    Assistant Camera Jerry Leu

    Gaffer Matte Chi

    Grip Kenny Gee, Basil Mironer

    Makeup & Hair Styling Elaine Décor

    Wardrobe & Art Direction Gayle Hariff, Laetitia Gangotena

    Boom Operator Swee Wee Keong

    Sound Recordist Tan Shijie

    Onset Photography Laetitia Gangotena, Basil Mironer, Kenny Gee

    Translator You Sokunpanha

    Driver Tyheang Pheakdey, Lak Broas

    Colourist Charles Lim

    Sound Design Edwin Wijaya, Leonard Fong

    Composer Danny Imson

    PRESS AND INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION / SALES CONTACT

    13littlepictures@gmail.com

    http://vimeo.com/23915001

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  • Sayang

    Singapore | 8 min | 2010 | Color | English | DigiBeta PAL

    Synopsis

    A personal rumination on love and loss, using the images and sounds of famous movies. Just as, in movies, we see through another’s eyes, hear through another’s ears, this film stands as an experiment to see if we could also speak through another’s mouth.

    Director’s Statement

    Making a film, for me, is very much like being in love. It is a tautology. A friend asks me, “Why do you make films?” I stumble. “I make films because I make films.” Like love, all discussion of a film seems to go around it. We can talk about what the film means to us, to society, to history – an important, if not the most important, act of filmmaking – but the film remains unscathed. The film is. In any film, you can shoot a person however you see him/her, but that wouldn’t – and shouldn’t – change who and what the person is. The person remains the same – nothing more, nothing less.

    And so it seems that making a film is like pointing at somebody you love, and saying, “There!” I cannot explain myself, nor can I defend my love – I can only present. Language is always too much and not enough. Maybe that’s why I can only make films about people I love…

    How do you make others understand why you love someone? How do you express the grief, anxiety, jealousies, joy, vertigo, that the person you love gives you? Someone asks me, “Why do you love me?” I stumble. “I love you because I love you.”

    This film is dedicated to Yasmin Ahmad.

    Directors Biography

    Daniel Hui is a filmmaker and writer. A graduate of the film program in California Institute of the Arts, his films have been screened at film festivals in Rotterdam, Hawaii, Manila, Seoul, Bangkok, and Vladivostok. His writings have been published in prominent cinema journals, including the Cinematheque Quarterly of the National Museum Singapore. He is the contributing editor to the Network for the Promotion of Asian Cinema (NETPAC) online journal, Cinemas of Asia. He is also one of the founding members of 13 Little Pictures, an independent film collective whose films have garnered critical acclaim all around the world. He recently won the Pixel Bunker Award for International New Talent at the Doclisboa International Film Festival for his début feature film Eclipses.

    Technical Specifications

    Directed by: Daniel Hui

    Country of production: Singapore

    Year of production: 2010

    Original Format: Hi-8

    Aspect Ratio: 1:1.33

    Sound: Stereo

    PRESS AND INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION / SALES CONTACT

    13littlepictures@gmail.com

    Watch the Film: Vimeo

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  • One Day in June

    Singapore | 10min | Mandarin, Hokkien | English | HD-PAL

    • International Film Festival Rotterdam, The Netherlands 2010
    • World Film Festival Bangkok, Thailand 2010
    • Singapore Short Cuts, National Museum of Singapore 2010
    • Asian Hot Shots Berlin, Germany 2010
    • Sintok Film Festival Tokyo, Japan 2012

    Synopsis

    A woman returns from abroad. In her state of jetlag, she finds herself falling between the gaps of the past and present.

    In long, poetic shots, sorrow and loneliness are tangible. With the film, Hui has created a small-scale drama that evokes questions but does not answer them.

    Throughout the presentation of the narrative, Hui is interested in images that are uneasy of themselves – images that seem to want to be other images. With a Heideggerian ontological concern in mind, Hui pushes each image to the horizon of being and non-being, and of truth and illusion.

    – 7th Singapore Short Cuts, National Museum of Singapore

    Directors Biography

    Daniel Hui is a filmmaker and writer. A graduate of the film program in California Institute of the Arts, his films have been screened at film festivals in Rotterdam, Hawaii, Manila, Seoul, Bangkok, and Vladivostok. His writings have been published in prominent cinema journals, including the Cinematheque Quarterly of the National Museum Singapore. He is the contributing editor to the Network for the Promotion of Asian Cinema (NETPAC) online journal, Cinemas of Asia. He is also one of the founding members of 13 Little Pictures, an independent film collective whose films have garnered critical acclaim all around the world. He recently won the Pixel Bunker Award for International New Talent at the Doclisboa International Film Festival for his début feature film Eclipses.

    Technical Specifications

    Country of production: Singapore

    Production Companies: 13 Little Pictures

    Running length: 10 Minutes

    Year of production: 2010

    Language: English, Mandarin, Hokkien

    Subtitles: English

    Original Format: HD-PAL

    Screening Format: HDCAM

    Aspect Ratio: 16:9

    Sound: Stereo

    Cast

    Vel Ng

    Teoh Kim Eng

    Brendon Fernandez

    Crew

    Director/Writer/Producer: Daniel Hui

    Cinematographer/Editor: Looi Wan Ping

    Original Idea: Jonathan Crisman

    Sound Engineer: Nicholas Lee

    Sound Design: Takuya Katsu

    Assistant Director/Co-producer: Tan Bee Thiam

    Associate Producers: Lim Lung Chieh, Athalia Ho

    Grips: Vince Ong, Mike Lau

    Still Photographer/Publicity Design: Colin Teo

    PRESS AND INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION / SALES CONTACT

    13littlepictures@gmail.com

    Watch the Film: Vimeo

    Cast

    Vel Ng

    Teoh Kim Eng

    Brendon Fernandez

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  • Two Fingers Imitating Legs Walking

    Directed and Written by Wesley Leon Aroozoo

    Country of production: Singapore

    Genre: Experimental

    Running Time: 9 minutes

    Music: Bani Haykal

    Introduction

    I have to be honest and say the months that followed weren’t my best. I was stereotypically grumpy. I had the whole slew of normality that followed with friends calling up and asking If I’m okay. Asking me out for a drink. Forget about her, let’s go out for a drink. Let’s go fishing. If there is anything you want to talk about, I’m here for you and other of the very sweet but utter bullshit. Bullshit like abled people coming into a crowded lift only to go up or down for one level.

    Then when you think the ordeal is over. It’s the time they share dessert with their tiny little forks.

    Directors Biography

    Wesley Leon Aroozoo graduated from Nanyang Technological University and is now pursuing his Master of Fine Arts at NYU Tisch Asia. In 2010, he was selected as one of Tokyo Filmex’s Next Masters. His short films, such as KISSING FACES (Rotterdam), have screened at over 80 festivals.

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  • Red Dragonflies

    Singapore | 96 min | English, Mandarin, Malay, Japanese | English, Traditional Chinese Subtitles | HD

    • Special Jury Prize, International Competition: Jeonju International Film Festival 2010
    • International Competition: Buenos Aires International Festival of Independent Films 2010 (BAFICI)
    • FIPRESCI Competition: Hong Kong International Film Festival 2010
    • Asian New Talent Competition: Shanghai International Film Festival 2010
    • International Competition: Santiago International Film Festival 2010
    • Winds of Asia-Arab Competition, Tokyo International Film Festival 2010

    “a film that we valued above all for its mysterious evocation of Singapore’s disappearing history – both social and personal – and its gentle depiction of innocence and passing youth. We felt that there were moments in this small, relatively low-budget, non-formulaic film by first time director Liao Jiekai that displayed great sensitivity and promise for the future.” – International Competition Jury of Jeonju International Film Festival (critic/curators Philip Cheah and Michael Witt and filmmakers Nacer Khemir, Bae Chang-ho and Lav Diaz)

    “The film delicately interweaves personal memory with the excavation of the recent past of Singapore.” – Chris Fujiwara

    “Nostalgia doesn’t quite get to the complexity of Red Dragonflies‘ poetic charge… there is a suggestion of a flashback structure, but past and present aren’t rendered in the usual visual cues of nostalgia or remembrance. Rather, past and present are the same shallow-focus dreamworld, where the sounds of the world –- a shopping mall drone, an air-con rumble, the echoing chirps of birds –- sear vividly into focus (thanks to a near-complete lack of background music). It’s as if the present isn’t the natural consequence of the past; rather, the two are chasing each other, running in parallel, haunting each other as memory, hope, loss, and conjecture… Red Dragonflies captures that marvelous fog of nostalgia, yes, but is also of reflection about ourselves in every tense.” – Brian Hu

    Website: reddragonflies.sg

    Synopsis

    Rachel and her two friends explore an abandoned railway track that runs through a dense forest, but an unforeseen incident brings their little adventure to an abrupt end. Elsewhere, 26-year-old Rachel rekindles an old friendship with a high school friend. When a little boy from her past reappears, Rachel finds herself retracing a trail of iron and wood. Wistful and mysterious, the film depicts a world littered with incongruity, absences and traces of childhood dreams.

    Director’s Statement

    The project RED DRAGONFLIES started with a discovery of a home-video tape, which documented a hike through an abandoned railway track back in my high school days. The handheld footage that was collectively recorded by different people was an exciting find for me. More than just mere personal memories, the video reveals an intertwined relationship between the place, the people and the time: there is something displaced yet strangely coherent about a group of 17-year-olds dressed in red and white T-shirts and black track pants, walking through an overgrown railway in the early months of 2002. I conceived the film from personal memories of growing up and sentiments about a point in life where one starts to rethink childhood dreams, the purpose of work, and the pursuit of happiness.

    The film also depicts a series of portraits of places. In a city undergoing rapid redevelopment, Singapore’s old towns, aging infrastructures and icons of the previous century are being torn down or refurbished. Upon the completion of our production, parts of the abandoned railway tracks were demolished to make way for the expansion of a Buddhist temple in the neighborhood; other segments were barricaded for redevelopment. By filming slices of life in these places and realigning them in the context of the story, I want to capture and preserve the collective memories of different generations of people, and how they affect the characters in both profound and mundane ways.

    Director’s Biography

    Liao Jiekai, graduate of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, directed RED DRAGONFLIES (Special Jury Prize, Jeonju) and edited WHITE DAYS. He is also the contributing artist to Nedko Solakov’s The Flying Method of an Artist with a Fear of Flying at the Singapore Biennale 2011.

    Technical Specifications

    Country of production: Singapore

    Running length: 96 minutes / COLOR

    Year of production: 2010

    Language: English, Mandarin, Malay, Japanese

    Subtitles: English and Traditional Chinese

    Original Format: HD

    Screening Format: HDCAM

    Aspect Ratio: 1:1.85

    Sound: Stereo

    Crew

    Director/Writer: Liao Jiekai

    Producers: Lyn-Anne Loy, Tan Bee Thiam

    Cinematographer: Looi Wan Ping

    Sound Recordists: Lam Yong Jin, Lee Kar Hoe Matthew Nicholas, Lan Hao Yong Douglas, Lim Lung Chieh

    Editors: Liao Jiekai, Looi Wan Ping, Tan Bee Thiam

    Sound Design: Matthew Koh

    Assistant Director: Daniel Hui

    Production Designer: Annette Heitmann

    Art Director: Roan Lizhen

    Camera Assistant/Gaffer: Kel Tay

    Grips: Athalia Ho, Oh Jiji

    Art Department Assistants: Lee Kexin, Wu Huimin

    Music: Hualampong Riddim, Leslie Low

    Colorists: Peace Villow, Noppasak Poonpipat

    Set Photographer: Han Tan

    Publicity Design: Debbie Ding

    Cast

    Ng Xuan Ming

    Jason Hui

    Thow Xin Wei

    Oon Yee Jeng

    Yeo Shang Xuan

    Ong Kuan Loong

    Chen Mei Guang

    Haruka Ashida

    Previous Screenings (Prizes Awarded)

    2010

    Jeonju International Film Festival (Special Jury Prize – International Competition)

    Buenos Aires International Festival of Independent Films (International Competition)

    Hong Kong International Film Festival (FIPRESCI Competition)

    Shanghai International Film Festival (Asian New Talent Competition)

    Press and International Distribution / Sales Contact

    13littlepictures@gmail.com

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y0Mtm-Eprmk

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  • Peep

    Country of Production : Singapore| Length : 6 minutes | Language : English | Subtitles : English| Format – HDV

    • Festivals : Asian Hot Shots Berlin

    SYNOPSIS

    Peep starts with an affidavit about the plight of sharks in the world’s oceans.

    “Each year there is about seventy confirmed shark attacks and about fifteen shark attack fatalities around the world. The number has risen over the past several decades but not because sharks are more aggressive but humans have simply taken to coastal waters in increasing numbers.”

    There are no sharks, at least of the Animal Planet variety, in Wesley Aroozoo’s Peep. However, the combination of the noun “Shark” and the verb “Peep” does clue us in on the subject of this experimental short about loan sharks. More significantly, the film deals with the irreversibility of one’s personal history, which arises from the obliteration of the family unit in the aftermath of a singularly historic event.

    The film is based on a personal experience. Aroozoo is called to arms after he experiences first-hand the devastating effects loan sharks had on his neighbours. With this film, he hopes to gain insights into the situation faced by his neighbours and the impetus which drove them from their home, never to return.

    – 7th Singapore Short Cuts, National Museum of Singapore

    DIRECTOR’S BIOGRAPHY

    Wesley is a practising artist from 13 Little Pictures, Pinball Collective and Studio Thirteen, based at the Goodman Arts Centre. His works are showcased in over 90 festivals internationally such as The International Film Festival Rotterdam and the Sapporo International Film Festival. As an educator, Wesley is a lecturer in the Faculty of Media Arts at Lasalle College of the Arts.

    On the literary front, Wesley is a published author with Bedok Reservoir (Math Paper Press, 2012). He has written television scripts for Mediacorp and stage plays for local theatre companies. Wesley is also an active film curator with the VIDEOvoiddeck series at the Substation and film screenings for various art organisations.

    He is a graduate with a Master of Fine Arts from New York University Tisch Asia and a Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours from Nanyang Technological University. Wesley has previously lectured at Nanyang Technological University and mentored various film workshops.

    TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

    Country of production: Singapore

    Production Companies: 13 Little Pictures

    Partners:

    Running length: 6 minutes

    Year of production: 2010

    Language: English

    Subtitles: English

    Original Format: HDV

    Screening Format: DVD

    Aspect Ratio: 16:9

    Sound: Stereo

    Website:

    CREW

    Director – Wesley Leon Aroozoo

    Assistant Director – Pereira Angela Maureen

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